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Norsk | English
 
Norsk | English

Gloria Rehm

Gloria Rehm, Germany

Soprano, Germany

 «My dog sings along with me a lot. When I start warming up, she will cross the whole flat to sit next to me and join in.»


What inspired you to become a singer?

I was influenced a lot by my parents, who loved opera and classical music in general. There was always music at home, and I used to sing in choirs, including little solo roles. Nevertheless, the decision to study singing wasn't made before the age of 20, when I started to take proper singing lessons and suddenly realised, "I could actually do this for a living!". I quit my studies (French and Journalism) and jumped into the unknown.

 

What’s your dream role and why?
Oh, so many! It seems to me that your favourite role is always the one you are working on. My voice loves Strauss and Mozart, so Konstanze, Zerbinetta and Sophie are roles that I have wanted to sing for a long time; on the other hand I enjoy the acting part a lot, and creating the bizarre, dramatic, dark colours of Marie in Die Soldaten, Queen of the Night or Lulu challenges me in a different way.

 

Who is your favourite singer and why?
I don't have one single favourite singer, it depends on the repertoire or the role. Unfortunately, I was never able to listen to a live performance of undoubtable luminaries of the past century such as Maria Callas, Fritz Wunderlich, Luciano Pavarotti or Kirsten Flagstaff. This, to me, is a very sad fact.

 

What do you hope to achieve by participating in The Queen Sonja International Music Competition?
I like to put my nerves to the test and to see how I can find my place within a hand-selected, international  of young colleagues. Furthermore, I really like the idea that there will also be a master class, and really hope for inspiring and helpful feedback.

 

Tell us something surprising or unexpected about yourself!
My dog sings along with me a lot. When I start warming up, she will cross the whole flat to sit next to me and join in. Once she was asked to perform "Prendi, per me sei libero" with me during a little gala. She did great.

 

Is there anything else you would like to tell us, which might be interesting to the public?
The public itself plays a big role within the creation of a performance. The energy they give, the attention, the excitement, is something you can sometimes almost grasp with your hands if you are on stage. It is a wonderful feeling! I am very happy and thankful that there are so many people who love to listen to classical music.

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